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Angels in America Part Two Perestroika

Angels in America Part Two Perestroika - 94 edition

ISBN13: 978-1559360739

Cover of Angels in America  Part Two   Perestroika 94 (ISBN 978-1559360739)
ISBN13: 978-1559360739
ISBN10: 1559360739
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 94
Publisher: Theatre Communications Group
Published: 1994
International: No

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Angels in America Part Two Perestroika - 94 edition

ISBN13: 978-1559360739

Tony Kushner

ISBN13: 978-1559360739
ISBN10: 1559360739
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 94
Publisher: Theatre Communications Group

Published: 1994
International: No
Summary

Angels in America, Pt. 2:Perestroika: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes
Author: Kushner, Tony
Binding: Paperback
Publishing Date: 11/1993
Publisher: Theatre Communications Group, Incorporated
The most anticipated new American play of the decade, this brilliant work is an emotional, poetic, political epic in two parts: Millennium Approaches and Perestroika. Spanning the years of the Reagan administration, it weaves the lives of fictional and historical characters into a feverish web of social, political, and sexual revelations.

Vanity Fair (March 1993)
'['Angels in America'] is about a decade and a zeitgeist which you just can't discuss without discussing the plague. So it's not a melodrama, like 'The Normal Heart', which I greatly admired, or a rant like 'As Is', which I greatly didn't. It's a meditation.'

J.M. Ditsky - Choice:
If it seems unlikely--given its thicket of accompanying blurbs--that any gay male reviewer could be dispassionate about Tony Kushner's two Angels in America plays, then what about the rest of reviewerkind? Truth to tell, the useof the angel motif in these dramas about living and dying with AIDS is both stunning and beautiful, while the presence of the late and unlamented Roy Cohn is as impressive as it is distracting. The dialogue throughout is deft, off-puttingly light, and slangy; the tone established is one of dark humor, whistling past the graveyard. What the reader must supply is a visual dimension merely adumbrated by the text--though that is hardly any fault of the text. . . . Current politically correct norms make objectivity about these plays difficult for the moment, but for that moment, these are necessary acquisitions for libraries of every sort.