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Attacking Faulty Reasoning : A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments

Attacking Faulty Reasoning : A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments - 4th edition

ISBN13: 978-0534551339

Cover of Attacking Faulty Reasoning : A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments 4TH 01 (ISBN 978-0534551339)
ISBN13: 978-0534551339
ISBN10: 0534551335
Cover type:
Edition/Copyright: 4TH 01
Publisher: Wadsworth, Inc
Published: 2001
International: No

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Attacking Faulty Reasoning : A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments - 4TH 01 edition

ISBN13: 978-0534551339

T. Edward Damer

ISBN13: 978-0534551339
ISBN10: 0534551335
Cover type:
Edition/Copyright: 4TH 01
Publisher: Wadsworth, Inc

Published: 2001
International: No
Summary

ATTACKING FAULTY REASONING is the most comprehensive, readable, and theoretically sound book on the common fallacies. It is designed to help one construct and evaluate arguments. The overriding purpose of the text is to help the students recognize when they construct or encounter a good or successful argument of a particular action or belief. This one skill is reinforced on every page of the text, from the first three chapters that focus on the criteria for a good argument, through the four major chapters on the fallacies or ways that arguments can go wrong. The emphasis is on resolving issues rather than pointing out flaws in arguments.

Table of Contents

Preface.
Introduction.


1. A CODE OF INTELLECTUAL CONDUCT.

The Fallibility Principle.
The Truth-Seeking Principle.
The Clarity Principle.

2. WHAT IS AN ARGUMENT?

An Argument Is a Claim Supported by Other Claims.
Distinguishing Argument from Opinion.
The Burden of Proof Principle.
The Standard Form of an Argument.
The Principle of Charity.
Deductive Versus Inductive Strength of Arguments.
Moral Arguments.

3. WHAT IS A GOOD ARGUMENT?

A Good Argument Must Meet Four Criteria.
The Relevance Principle.
The Acceptability Principle.
The Sufficiency Principle.
The Rebuttal Principle.
Making Arguments Stronger.
Applying the Criteria to Arguments.
Constructing Good Arguments.
The Resolution Principle.
The Suspension of Judgment.
The Reconsideration Principle.

4. WHAT IS A FALLACY?

A Fallacy Violates a Criterion of a Good Argument.
Named Versus Unnamed Fallacies.
Organization of the Fallacies.
Attacking the Fallacy.
Rules of the Game.

5. FALLACIES THAT VIOLATE THE RELEVANCE CRITERION.

Fallacies of Irrelevance.
Irrelevant or Questionable Authority.
Appeal to Common Opinion.
Genetic Fallacy.
Rationalization.
Drawing the Wrong Conclusion.
Using the Wrong Reasons.
Irrelevant Emotional Appeals.
Appeal to Pity.
Appeal to Force or Threat.
Appeal to Tradition.
Appeal to Personal Circumstances.
Exploitation of Strong Feelings.
Use of Flattery.
Assigning Guilt by Association.

6. FALLACIES THAT VIOLATE THE ACCEPTABILITY CRITERION.

Fallacies of Linguistic Confusion.
Equivocation.
Ambiguity.
Improper Accent.
Illicit Contrast.
Argument by Innuendo.
Misuse of a Vague Expression.
Distinction Without a Difference.
Begging-the-Question Fallacies.
Arguing in a Circle.
Question-Begging Language.
Complex Question.
Leading Question.
Question-Begging Definition.
Unwarranted Assumption Fallacies.
Fallacy of the Continuum.
Fallacy of Composition.
Fallacy of Division.
False Alternatives.
Is-Ought Fallacy.
Wishful Thinking.
Misuse of a Principle.
Fallacy of the Mean.
Faulty Analogy.
Fallacy of Novelty.

7. FALLACIES THAT VIOLATE THE SUFFICIENCY CRITERION.

Fallacies of Missing Evidence.
Insufficient Sample.
Unrepresentative Data.
Arguing from Ignorance.
Contrary-to-Fact Hypothesis.
Fallacy of Popular Wisdom.
Inference from a Name or Description.
Fallacy of Impossible Precision.
Special Pleading.
Omission of Key Evidence.
Causal Fallacies.
Confusion of a Necessary with a Sufficient Condition.
Causal Oversimplification.
Post Hoc Fallacy.
Confusion of Cause and Effect.
Neglect of a Common Cause.
Domino Fallacy.
Gambler's Fallacy.

8. FALLACIES THAT VIOLATE THE REBUTTAL CRITERION.

Fallacies of Counter Evidence.
Denying the Counter Evidence.
Ignoring the Counter Evidence.
Ad Hominem Fallacies.
Abusive Ad Hominem.
Poisoning the Well.
Tu Quoque Fallacy.
Fallacies of Diversion.
Attacking a Straw Man.
Trivial Objections.
Red Herring. Diversionary Humor or Ridicule.



GLOSSARY OF FALLACIES.
INDEX.

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