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Best Practices in Educational Interpreting

Best Practices in Educational Interpreting - 2nd edition

ISBN13: 978-0205386024

Cover of Best Practices in Educational Interpreting 2ND 04 (ISBN 978-0205386024)
ISBN13: 978-0205386024
ISBN10: 0205386024
Cover type:
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 04
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
Published: 2004
International: No
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Best Practices in Educational Interpreting - 2ND 04 edition

ISBN13: 978-0205386024

Brenda Chafin Seal

ISBN13: 978-0205386024
ISBN10: 0205386024
Cover type:
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 04
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.

Published: 2004
International: No
Summary

Designed for all who work with the heterogeneous population of students with hearing loss, Best Practices in Educational Interpreting, Second Edition, offers state-of-the-art information for interpreters in primary through higher education settings.

This text provides a comprehensive, developmentally organized overview of the process of interpreting in educational settings. Issues and methods are presented from a practical orientation, with representative cases that illustrate the topics. Students learn about the changing needs of the hearing impaired as they move from primary school through college. It is an ample resource as a stand-alone book and serves as a perfect supplement to a widely recognized "good books" library on deafness.

Features

  • Discusses techniques applicable to interpreters who use sign language, cued speech, and oral interpreting.
  • Explores real-world issues through the use of cases and vignettes throughout the text, giving students road maps for problem solving through the use of "best practice" solutions.
  • Presents the future of educational interpreting from a research perspective that focuses on what we have learned, what we are gaining from current research, and where we need to go for further learning.
  • Provides an excellent resource for anyone working with deaf and hard-of-hearing students, including interpreters, regular education teachers, parents, speech-language pathologists, and deaf educators.

New To This Edition

  • Incorporates new information on language learning from infancy through adulthood, which provides readers with a broader scope of knowledge in language learning and the interpreter's role in matching language of the educational setting to the advancing language levels of the consumers (Chs. 3, 4, 5 & 6).
  • Provides up-to-date news on technology in the field, including expectations for cochlear implant students of various ages, explanations of how to use assistive technology, and information on how to incorporate technology into one's professional development as an interpreter.
  • Includes current information on the status of educational interpreting that provides readers with updates on the state of the nation's educational interpreting in K-12 and in higher education settings.
  • Encourages a contemporary mindset by providing readers with cases addressing current issues surrounding new technology, new demands on interpreters, and new ethical dilemmas.

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements.
Dedication.

1. Educational Interpreting: An Introduction.

Interpreting and Inclusion.
The Scope of Practice for Educational Interpreters.
Current Practices.
The Audience and Contents of This Book.
Time for a Change.
How to Read the Chapters for Maximum Learning.

2. Best Practices in the Administration of Educational Interpreting Services.

Question 1: Who is responsible for administering educational interpreting services?
Question 2: What is involved in the position description for an educational interpreting services provider?
Question 3: What is involved in the contract for an educational interpreter?
Question 4: What is involved in the policy statement or policy manual for educational interpreting services?
Question 5: How should the interpreter be evaluated?
Question 6: What are the best practices for handling difficult administrative situations?
The Case of the Nonattending Student.
The Case of the New Cochlear Implant.
The Case of the Moving Family.
The Case of the Disgruntled Parents.
The Case of Evaluating the Interpreter.
The Case of Equal Access to the Handouts.
The Case of Changing Technologies.

3. Best Practices in Educational Interpreting in the Primary Grades Setting.

Question 1: What is expected of the educational interpreter in the primary grades?
Question 2: What is the interpreter's role in working with an educational team?
Question 3: Are there problems with confidentiality when the interpreter is expected to share information about the student with others?
Question 4: What should the interpreter do during free play and other activities that are designed to promote social interaction?
Question 5: Should the interpreter be expected to teach sign language (or cued speech or fingerspelling) to other students and adults?
Question 6: What is the interpreter's role during story reading?
Question 7: What is the role of fingerspelling in a primary educational setting?
Question 8: Should signs be invented in the preschool and primary setting?
Question 9: Should interpreters use their perspective or their student's perspective when interpreting number lines, calendars, and other spatial propositions?
Question 10: What are the best practices in handling difficult interpreting situations in preschool and primary settings?
The Case of the Positioned Interpreter.
The Case of the Inattentive Child.
The Case of the Brer Rabbit Stories.
The Case of the Aggressive Student.
The Case of the Parent Conference.
The Case of the Phone Call.

4. Best Practices in Interpreting in the Elementary- and Middle-School Setting.

Question 1: What is expected of the educational interpreter in the elementary- and middle-school settings?
Question 2: How should the interpreter deal with textbook language in the curriculum?
Question 3: What is the interpreter's responsibility with other curriculum situations that are not textbook bound?
Question 4: What about interpreting for fieldtrips, assemblies, musicals, and otherspecial learning experiences?
Question 5: What is the interpreter's role in interpreting tests?
Question 6: What is the role of the interpreter with students who present a "mixed communication profile" ?
Question 7: What is the interpreter's role in teaching the deaf or hard-of-hearing student to become an effective consumer of interpreting services?
Question 8: What are the best practices in handling difficult interpreting situationsin elementary- and middle-school settings?
The Case of the Difficult Teacher.
The Case of the "Redneck" Jokes.
The Case of Weekly Religious Education.
The Case of the Locker Room.
The Case of Cheating.
The Case of Mocking.

5. Best Practices in Interpreting in High School and Vocational Settings.

Question 1: What is expected of interpreters in secondary educational settings?
Question 2: How does curriculum differentiation affect the interpreter?
Question 3: What is different about interpreting in vocational and laboratory settings?
Question 4: How does technology affect interpreting?
Question 5: What about interpreting in transition programs for secondary students?
Question 6: How does scheduling affect secondary interpreters?
Question 7: What other curriculum issues present extraordinary challenges to interpreters in secondary settings?
Question 8: What is the interpreter's role regarding consumerism in the educational program?
Question 9: What are the best practices for these difficult situations?
The Case of the Knife.
The Case of Driver Education.
The Case of the Student Teacher.
The Case of the Work Transition Assignment.
The Case of the Grandmother.
The Case of the Vocational Test.

6. Interpreting in Higher Education.

Question 1: What can educational interpreters expect in higher educational settings?
Question 2: What can the interpreter expect regarding curriculum?
Question 3: What happens when the interpreter cannot visualize the information, when there's a breakdown, a miscue, or an error?
Question 4: What about interpreting in graduate school?
Interview with Steve Nover, Doctoral Candidate on his Use of Interpreters.
Interview with Bonnie Poitras Tucker on Her Use of Oral Interpreters.
Interview with Donna About Interpreting in a Doctoral Program.
Question 5: What obligations do educational interpreters have for their own life-long learning?
Question 6: What are the best practices for these difficult cases?
The Case of Group Work.
The Case of Interpreters Teaming with Interpreters.
The Case of the Sleeping Student.
The Case of the New Signing Student.
The Case of the Final Semester Presentations.

7. Research in Educational Interpreting.

Question 1: Why is research in educational interpreting important?
Question 2: What research has occurred to date in educational interpreting?
Category 1: The current status of and consequential need for educational interpreters.
Category 2: Evaluation of interpreters engaged in interpreting.
Category 3: Interpreting in post secondary educational settings.
Category 4: Other research.
Question 3: What research questions remain to be asked?
Chapter Conclusions.

Appendix.

RID Standard Practice Paper.
Code of Ethics of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc.
The RID Certification Maintenance Program.
Cued Speech Transliterator Assessments.

Index.

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