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Composition of Everyday Life - A Guide to Writing, Brief Edition

Composition of Everyday Life - A Guide to Writing, Brief Edition - 2nd edition

ISBN13: 978-1413022919

Cover of Composition of Everyday Life - A Guide to Writing, Brief Edition 2ND 07 (ISBN 978-1413022919)
ISBN13: 978-1413022919
ISBN10: 141302291X
Cover type:
Edition: 2ND 07
Copyright: 2007
Publisher: Wadsworth, Inc
Published: 2007
International: No

Other Editions for Composition of Everyday Life - A Guide to Writing, Brief Edition

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Composition of Everyday Life - A Guide to Writing, Brief Edition - 2ND 07 edition

ISBN13: 978-1413022919

John Mauk and John Metz

ISBN13: 978-1413022919
ISBN10: 141302291X
Cover type:
Edition: 2ND 07
Copyright: 2007
Publisher: Wadsworth, Inc
Published: 2007
International: No
Summary

Showing students that the act of writing is connected to everyday living, THE COMPOSITION OF EVERYDAY LIFE, BRIEF EDITION makes invention the primary component of your writing course and helps students re-discover concepts, uncover meaning, and re-think the world around them.

New to the Edition

  • The most extensive coverage of thesis development in any writing guide is now further augmented by all new Thesis Sections in each invention chapter. These sections contain prompts, sample thesis statements, common thesis problems, and an Evolution of a Thesis chart, which illustrates the gradual development of an idea and helps students develop revelatory thesis statements for their writing projects.
  • Each invention chapter now provides a variety of revision prompts. They appear throughout the Invention, Organizational Strategies, and Writer's Voice sections and invite students to stop and re-focus on their ideas and to investigate the value and complexity of those ideas. Each chapter also includes a new Peer Review section so that writers can share their projects with others and receive focused and helpful feedback.
  • At the end of each invention chapter, the new Delivery section contains questions about the consequences of students' writing. Students are prompted to see the relationship between their work and the world around them. The Delivery sections also invite students to go "Beyond the Essay"--to take their ideas from the chapter and re-cast them in some other format: a poster, a cartoon, and so on.
  • A new Vitality section in each invention chapter explains and illustrates particular strategies for pruning, weeding, trimming, and vitalizing the writing. The Vitality section is an intensive editing step in the invention process.
  • A new Chapter 5, "Analyzing Images," helps students analyze a particular image, develop focused explanation, and communicate their ideas in writing. Students learn to explain how the elements of an image work to impact the feelings and consciousness of viewers.
  • Twenty new readings from a variety of disciplines demonstrate effective rhetorical strategies. Each reading is followed by Writing Strategies and Exploring Ideas questions to help students read actively and critically.

Features

  • Unlike any other writing guide, THE COMPOSITION OF EVERYDAY LIFE, BRIEF EDITION offers eleven invention chapters, guiding students not to simply invent ideas, but to actually be inventive thinkers.
  • Point of Contact sections encourage the student to slow down and notice the life around them, while considering possibilities for writing topics, thus promoting the union of invention and everyday life.
  • Analysis sections help students discover the meaning and significance of ideas while prompting them to explore their topics with questions and dialogic activities.
  • Public Resonance sections illustrate that writing is public in nature and helps students shape their writing for an audience.
  • Equally important is the process of delivering ideas. The Delivery section follows Invention, and includes information on Rhetorical Tools, Organizational Strategies, Writer's Voice, and Revision Strategies, and helps guide the student as they develop, arrange, and revise their ideas.
  • To further expand the connection between writing and everyday life, each chapter also includes Considering Consequences, prompting students to write about the real consequences of the ideas communicated.
  • The 60 plus readings include both professional and student writers from a variety of disciplines. The strategies promoted in CEL are implemented by one of the writers in each chapter, illustrating the process and helping the student see it in use.
  • Each chapter opens with a visual element and includes questions and ideas for the student to consider. The importance of visual rhetoric is illustrated throughout the text, in additional elements within an innovative and inviting attractive, full-color design.
  • The Discussion questions, following each reading, work to animate the readings and to bring them into the students' everyday lives. By asking students to do more than consider or discuss, they prompt students into action, and send the message that reading and writing are not activities that belong exclusively to the classroom.
  • Chapter 12, "Research and Writing," provides relevant information on gathering and using sources, and places their importance within the context of writing. It covers field research (e.g. interviewing and observation) as well as print and electronic research (using both MLA and APA format).
  • A unique Chapter 13, "Everyday Rhetoric?" shows students how their ideas can be developed and communicated in other formats and situations and helps make the connection between writing in school and influencing the world beyond. The chapter emphasizes the acts of developing and extending ideas using a variety of formats so students see that invention does not belong exclusively to the essay.

Table of Contents

Introduction.

1. REMEMBERING WHO YOU WERE.

Chapter Readings. Cindy Bosley, How I Lost the Junior Miss Pageant. Len Kress, Beat Education. Aunty D, The Aloha Spirit: A Reminiscence. Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak, The Thrill of Victory ... The Agony of Parents. Steve Mockensturm The Grapes of Mrs. Rath. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Considering Your Thesis. Narration. Scenarios. Allusion. Dialogue. Organizational Strategies. What Details Should I Include? How Should I Begin? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice. Using Figurative Language. Choosing Details. Using Slang. Choosing Allusions. Revision Strategies. Peer Revision. Global Revision. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

2. EXPLAINING RELATIONSHIPS.

Chapter Readings. Jessie Thuma, The Ring of Truth: My Child is Growing Up. John Steinbeck, Americans and the Land. Cindy Bosley, What the Honey Meant. David Hawes, Dog Tied. Dean Meek, Friend or Foe. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Considering Your Thesis. Using Narration. Using Description. Using Figurative Language. Organizational Strategies. How Should I Begin? Where Should My Thesis or Main Point Go? What Should I Conclude? When Should I Change Paragraphs? How Should I Make Transitions? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice. Writing Whispers. Writing Yells. Writing Pace. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

3. OBSERVING.

Chapter Readings. Annie Dillard, Living Like Weasels. Edward Abbey, Planting a Tree. Jane Goodall, Gombe. Chester McCovey, The Front Porch. Dean Meek, A Building of Mailboxes. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact: Finding a Subject to Observe. Analysis: What Meaning Can I Discover? Public Resonance: How Does This Matter to Others? Delivery. Rhetorical Tools: Focusing and Developing the Idea. Articulating Your Thesis. Using Details. Using Narrative. Using Allusions. Using Simile/Metaphor. Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns. How Should I Deal with Public Resonance? How Should I Arrange Details? When Should I Change Paragraphs? Writer's Voice: Exploring Options. The Present "I". The Invisible "I". Level of Formality. Projecting Wonder. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision. Considering Consequences. The Consequences of Your Essay. The Consequences of the Chapter Readings. The Consequences of Everyday Observations. Everyday Rhetoric. Writing, Speech, and Action Exploring Visual Rhetoric.

4. ANALYZING CONCEPTS.

Chapter Readings. Pico Iyer, In Praise of the Humble Comma. S.I. Hayakawa, What it Means to be Creative. Steven M. Richardson, College: What's in it for Me? Simon Benlow, Have It Your Way. Dan Wilkins, Why We No Longer Use the 'H' Word. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life. Analysis: What Does It Mean? Public Resonance: How Does It Matter to Others? Delivery. Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Ideas. Considering Your Thesis. Developing Support. Using Definitions. Using Outside Sources. Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns. How Should I Begin? When Should I Begin Paragraphs? Where Should My Thesis Go? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice: Exploring Options. Using Metaphor. Using Allusions. Promoting Curiosity. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. The Consequences of the Chapter Readings. The Consequences of Everyday Writing. Everyday Rhetoric. Writing, Speech, and Action Exploring Visual Rhetoric.

5. MAKING ARGUMENTS.

Chapter Readings. Ward Churchill, Crimes Against Humanity. David Crabtree, Why a Great Books Education is the Most Practical. Ann Marie Paulin, Cruelty, Civility, and Other Weighty Matters. Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak, Don't Make Me a Has-Bean! Therese Cherry, Beware of Drug Sales. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Main Claim/Thesis. Public Resonance. Scope. Arguability. Support. Kinds of Evidence. Kinds of Appeals. Counter-Argument. Using Counterargument to Develop Points. Using Counterargument to Qualify Your Thesis. Evolution of a Thesis: Point of Contact to. Argumentative Claim. Concession. Caution: Logical Fallacies Ahead. Organizational Strategies. The Writer's Voice. Revision Strategies. Peer Revision. Global Revision. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

6. RESPONDING TO ARGUMENTS.

Chapter Readings. Betsy Taylor, Response to Juliet Schor. Alice Walker, My Daughter Smokes. Daniel Bruno, Entitlement Education. Ann F. Causey, Is Hunting Ethical? Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Thesis. Using Support. Counter-Arguing. Conceding and Qualifying Points. Remembering Logical Fallacies. Organizational Strategies. Should I Quote the Original Argument? Summary. Paraphrase. How Much of the Argument Should I Concede? How Should I Structure My Response? Writer's Voice. Avoid Harsh Description. Avoid Character Slams. Consider Tone. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

7. EVALUATING.

Chapter Readings. Roger Ebert, Star Wars. Jayme Stayer, Whales R Us. Ed Bell, The Andy Griffith Show: Return to Normal. Simon Benlow, Pulp Fiction: Valuable Critique or Useless Titillation? Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Re-Thinking Divorce. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. The Elements of Evaluation. Summary/ Presentation. Analysis. Argument. Using Support about the Subject. Using Support outside the Subject. Organizational Strategies. Writer's Voice. Global Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

8. SEARCHING FOR CAUSES.

Chapter Readings. Juliet Schor, The New Politics of Consumption. Leonard Kress, Throwing Up Childhood. Deborah Tannen, Sex, Lies, and Advertising. Susan Jacoby, When Bright Girls Decide That Math Is a 'Waste of Time'. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Considering Your Thesis. Developing Support. Counter-Argument. Concession. Organizational Strategies. Where Should I Explain the Phenomenon? How Should I Deal with Other Causes? How Should I Include Outside Sources? Writer's Voice. Becoming an Authority. Projecting Wonder. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric?

9. PROPOSING SOLUTIONS.

Chapter Readings. Rachel Carson, The Obligation to Endure. Joan Didion, In Bed. Paul Roberts, How to Say Nothing in 500 Words. Ed Bell, Technology, Movement, and Sound. Dan Wilkins, Thoughts on the International Access Symbol. Rose Bachtel, Television: Destroying Childhood. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Articulating Your Thesis. Using Support. Discovering Counter-Arguments. Considering Alternative Solutions. Caution: Logical Fallacies Ahead. Organizational Strategies. How Should I Separate. Problem and Solution? How Should I Include Counter-Arguments? Where Should I Put Alternative Solutions? How Should I Include Concessions? Writer's Voice. Creating Reasonable Tone. Making Concessions. Avoiding Harsh Description. Avoiding Character Slams. Inviting the Reader. Using Verb Mood. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

10. EXPLORING THE ARTS.

Chapter Readings. Artistic Works. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings. Joy Harjo, Fire. Matthew Arnold, Dover Beach. U2, Running to Stand Still. Essays Exploring the Arts. Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, The Plight of High Status Women. Chester McCovey, The Parting Breath of the Now Perfect Woman. Geoffrey Bennett, Hip-Hop: A oadblock or Pathway to Black Empowerment? Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Discovering Your Thesis. Developing Support. Considering Counter-Argument. Considering Concession. Using the Elements of Evaluation. Organizational Strategies. Where Should I Summarize or Detail the Work? How Much Detail Should I Include? How Should I Begin? How Should I Integrate Lines of Songs, Poems, or Stories? Writer's Voice. Avoiding the Enthusiasm Crisis. Promoting Wonder. Considering the Tone of the Art. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric?

11. THINKING RADICALLY.

Chapter Readings. Wendell Berry, Farming and the Global Economy. Michael Moore, Why Doesn't G.M. Sell Crack? Christiane Northrup, M.D., The Menstrual Cycle. Simon Benlow, An Apology to Future Generations. Outside Reading. Invention. Point of Contact. Analysis. Public Resonance. Delivery. Rhetorical Tools. Considering Your Thesis. Developing Support. Using Allusions. Using Definitions. Using Outside Sources. Organizational Strategies. How Should I Begin? How Should I Deal with Counterarguments? Where Should My Thesis Go? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice. Projecting Wonder. Appealing to the Possible. Revision Strategies. Peer Review. Global Revision Questions. Considering Consequences. Everyday Rhetoric.

12. RESEARCH and WRITING (GATHERING AND USING INFORMATION FROM SOURCES).

Introduction. Why Get Information from Sources? When to Get Information from Sources. Where to Get Information from Sources. What is Plagiarism? Why Document Sources. Formal Versus Informal Documentation. A Word of Caution about Web Sites. Primary Research: Observation, Interviews, Surveys. Observations. Field Notes. Interviews. Asking the Right Questions. Asking Follow-up Questions. Surveys. Generating Questions. Choosing Respondents. Recording Responses. Secondary Research: Print and Electronic Sources. Searching the Library and the Internet. The Library. The Internet. The Sources of Information. Books. Periodicals. Newspapers. Government Documents. Reference Books. Audio-Visual Materials. Web Sites. Evaluating Sources. Relevance. Reliability. Timeliness. Diversity. Electronic Sources. Taking Notes on Secondary Sources. The Note. Paraphrase. Summary. Quotation. The Source. The Page Number. The Topic. Using Information from Sources. Organization and Sources. Counter-Arguing Sources. Textual Cues. Paragraph Transitions. Integrating the Paraphrase. Summary and Quotation. Paraphrase. Summary. Quotation. Integrating Quotations. Punctuating Quotations. 1. Quotation Marks Only. 2, Speaking Verb Followed by a Comma. 3. Complete Though. Followed by a Colon. Special Conditions in Quoting. Omitting Words. Adding Words. Noting an Error. Lengthy Quotes. Double Quotes. The Basic Concepts of Documentation Style: MLA and APA. Documenting Sources: MLA. In-Text Citation. Works Cited. Documenting Sources: APA. In-Text Citation. References List. Standard Abbreviations. Frequently Asked Questions. What Kind of Source Do I Have?

13. EVERYDAY RHETORIC.

Letters. Memos. News Releases. Brochures. Posters and Fliers. E-Mail. Web Sites. Verbal Communication (Speeches, Briefings, and Discussions). Visuals. Appendix: Subjects for Writing and Reading. Justice. The Environment. Consumerism. Human Relationships. Civic Engagement. Physical/Mental Health. Education. Culture and Everyday Life.

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