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Creation : An Appeal to Save Life on Earth

Creation : An Appeal to Save Life on Earth - 06 edition

ISBN13: 978-0393330489

Cover of Creation : An Appeal to Save Life on Earth 06 (ISBN 978-0393330489)
ISBN13: 978-0393330489
ISBN10: 0393330486
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 06
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.
Published: 2006
International: No

List price: $14.95

Creation : An Appeal to Save Life on Earth - 06 edition

ISBN13: 978-0393330489

E. O. Wilson

ISBN13: 978-0393330489
ISBN10: 0393330486
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 06
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.

Published: 2006
International: No
Summary

The book that launched a movement: ''Wilson speaks with a humane eloquence which calls to us all'' (Oliver Sacks), proposing a historic partnership between scientists and religious leaders to preserve Earth's rapidly vanishing biodiversity. ''The Creation'' is E. O. Wilson's most important work since the publications of ''Sociobiology'' and ''Biophilia,'' Like Rachel Carson's ''Silent Spring,'' it is a book about the fate of the earth and the survival of our planet. Yet while Carson was specifically concerned with insecticides and the ecological destruction of our natural resources, Wilson, the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner, attempts his new social revolution by bridging the seemingly irreconcilable worlds of fundamentalism and science. Like Carson, Wilson passionately concerned about the state of the world, draws on his own personal experiences and expertise as an entomologist, and prophesies that half the species of plants and animals on Earth could either have gone or at least are fated for early extinction by the end of our present century. Astonishingly, ''The Creation'' is not a bitter, predictable rant against fundamentalist Christians or deniers of Darwin. Rather, Wilson, a leading ''secular humanist,'' draws upon his own rich background as a boy in Alabama who ''took the waters,'' and seeks not to condemn this new generations of Christians but to address them on their own terms. Conceiving the book as an extended letter to a southern Baptist minister, Wilson, in stirring language that can evoke Martin Luther King's ''Letter from Birmingham Jail,'' tells this everyman minister how, in fact, the world really came to be. He pleads with these men of the cloth to understand the cataclysmicdamage that is destroying our planet and asks for their help in preventing the destruction of our Earth before it is too late. Never a pessimist, Wilson avers that there are solutions that may yet save the planet, and believes that the vision that he presents in ''The Creation'' is one that both scientists and pastors can accept, and work on together in spite of their fundamental ideological differences.