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House of the Dead and Poor Folk (Trade)

House of the Dead and Poor Folk (Trade) - 04 edition

ISBN13: 978-1593081942

Cover of House of the Dead and Poor Folk (Trade) 04 (ISBN 978-1593081942)
ISBN13: 978-1593081942
ISBN10: 1593081944
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 04
Publisher: Barnes&Noble Classics
Published: 2004
International: No

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House of the Dead and Poor Folk (Trade) - 04 edition

ISBN13: 978-1593081942

Fyodor Dostoevsky and Constance Translator Garnett

ISBN13: 978-1593081942
ISBN10: 1593081944
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 04
Publisher: Barnes&Noble Classics

Published: 2004
International: No
Summary

Arrested in 1849 for belonging to a secret group of radical utopians, Fyodor Dostoevsky was sentenced to four years in a Siberian labor camp--a terrible mental, spiritual, and physical ordeal that inspired him to write the novel The House of the Dead.

Told from the point of view of a fictitious narrator--a convict serving a ten-year sentence for murdering his wife--The House of the Dead describes in vivid detail the horrors that Dostoevsky himself witnessed while in prison: the brutality of guards who relish cruelty for its own sake; the evil of criminals who enjoy murdering children; and the existence of decent souls amid filth and degradation. More than just a work of documentary realism, The House of the Dead also describes the spiritual death and gradual resurrection from despair experienced by the novel's central character--a reawakening that culminates in his final reconciliation with himself and humanity.

Also included in this volume is Dostoevsky's first published work, Poor Folk, a novel written in the form of letters that brought Dostoevsky immediate critical and public recognition.

Book Dimensions 8" x 5 1/4"