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Introduction to Philosophical Analysis

Introduction to Philosophical Analysis - 4th edition

ISBN13: 978-0132663052

Cover of Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 4TH 97 (ISBN 978-0132663052)
ISBN13: 978-0132663052
ISBN10: 0132663058

Cover type: Hardback
Edition: 4TH 97
Copyright: 1997
Publisher: Prentice Hall, Inc.
Published: 1997
International: No

List price: $134.00

Introduction to Philosophical Analysis - 4TH 97 edition

ISBN13: 978-0132663052

John Hospers

ISBN13: 978-0132663052
ISBN10: 0132663058

Cover type: Hardback
Edition: 4TH 97
Copyright: 1997
Publisher: Prentice Hall, Inc.
Published: 1997
International: No
Summary

This text provides an in-depth, problem-oriented introduction to philosophical analysis using an extremely clear, readable approach. The Fourth Edition only updates coverage throughout the book, but also restores the introductory chapter--Words and the World--the most distinguished, widely acclaimed feature of the first two editions.

Examines the classic philosophical problems--mind and body, determinism, God, the limits and nature of knowledge, etc.--in terms of traditional and 20th century analytical methods.

Presents discussions in a clear, concise manner, using a relaxed, informal organization to make coverage more reader- friendly.

Develops a logical order of ideas--a question is asked, a word involved is defined or investigated, and a discussion is undertaken.

Provides extremely comprehensive analyses of each major issue.

Accounts for the considerations of language as they are needed (as opposed to including a lengthy introduction on language).

Examines metaphysical and linguistic approaches in detail to bring out the subtleties of each argument.

Table of Contents

1.Words and the World: Language and Reality.

Philosophical Questions.
Words and Things.
Definition.
Vagueness.
Connotation.
Ostensive Definition.
Meaninglessness.

2. What Can We Know? Knowledge.

What is Knowing?
The Sources of Knowledge.
Exercises.

3. What Is the World Like? Perceiving the World.

Common-Sense Realism.
Berkeley's Idealism.
The Attack on Foundations.
Exercises.

4.The Way the World Works: Scientific Knowledge.

Laws of Nature.
Explanation.
Theories.
Possibility.
The Problem of Induction.
Exercises.

5.What Is and What Must Be: Freedom and Necessity.

Mathematics.
Kant and the Synthetic Apriori.
Causality.
Determinism and Freedom.
Exercises.

6.What Am I? Mind and Body.

The Physical and the Mental.
The Relation Between the Physical and the Mental.
Personal Identity.
Exercises.

7.What Else Is There? Philosophy of Religion.

Religious Experience.
The Ongological Argument.
The Cosmological Argument.
The Argument from Miracles.
The Teleological Argument (The Argument from Design).
Anthropomorphism and Mysticism.
Exercises.

8.The Is and the Ought: Problems in Ethics.

Meta-ethics.
The Good.
Theories of Conduct.
Exercises.