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Miniature Guide For Those Who Teach on Practical Ways to Promote Active and Cooperative Learning - 3rd edition

Miniature Guide For Those Who Teach on Practical Ways to Promote Active and Cooperative Learning (ISBN10: 094458313X; ISBN13: 9780944583135)
ISBN13: 978-0944583135
ISBN10: 094458313X

Summary: Although bringing critical thinking into the classroom ultimately requires serious, long-term development, you don't need to sweat and slave and thoroughly understand critical thinking to begin to make important changes in your teaching. Many simple, straightforward, yet powerful strategies can be implemented immediately. In this guide we offer a sampling of such suggestions. They are powerful and useful, because each is a way to get students actively engaged in thinking about what they are tryi
ng to learn. Each represents a shift of responsibility for learning from the teacher to the student. These strategies suggest ways to get your students to do the hard work of learning. Many enable you to take advantage of what students already know and what they are able to figure out for themselves. Many involve students working together. All too often students get stuck, or don't understand what they are supposed to do. Several students working together can correct each other's misunderstandings and can make much more progress on tasks. When one student gets stuck, another might have just the right idea to move things along. This enables students to become responsible for more of their own learning. Over time, they begin to adopt the strategies they see their peers use successfully and learn to ask themselves critical questions raised by their peers. Another advantage of the following suggestions is their wide applicability. Most can be fruitfully applied to any subject, any topic. Most can become standard practice - techniques you continually use. For some of these strategies, we provide examples geared to different content they might be used to teach. At the heart of our approach is a realistic conception of what it takes for someone to learn something. In a sense, much instruction is unrealistic: "If I say it clearly, they should get it. If they give the right answer, they know it and understand it. If I show them what to do, ask them to
...show more
Summary: Although bringing critical thinking into the classroom ultimately requires serious, long-term development, you don't need to sweat and slave and thoroughly understand critical thinking to begin to make important changes in your teaching. Many simple, straightforward, yet powerful strategies can be implemented immediately. In this guide we offer a sampling of such suggestions. They are powerful and useful, because each is a way to get students actively engaged in thinking about what they are trying to learn. Each represents a shift of responsibility for learning from the teacher to the student. These strategies suggest ways to get your students to do the hard work of learning. Many enable you to take advantage of what students already know and what they are able to figure out for themselves. Many involve students working together. All too often students get stuck, or don't understand what they are supposed to do. Several students working together can correct each other's misunderstandings and can make much more progress on tasks. When one student gets stuck, another might have just the right idea to move things along. This enables students to become responsible for more of their own learning. Over time, they begin to adopt the strategies they see their peers use successfully and learn to ask themselves critical questions raised by their peers. Another advantage of the following suggestions is their wide applicability. Most can be fruitfully applied to any subject, any topic. Most can become standard practice - techniques you continually use. For some of these strategies, we provide examples geared to different content they might be used to teach. At the heart of our approach is a realistic conception of what it takes for someone to learn something. In a sense, much instruction is unrealistic: "If I say it clearly, they should get it. If they give the right answer, they know it and understand it. If I show them what to do, ask them to...show less

Edition/Copyright: 3RD 06
Cover:
Publisher: Foundation for Critical Thinking
Year Published: 2006
International: No



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