Buy Textbooks  |  Rent Textbooks  |  Sell Textbooks  |  eTextbooks
Help  |  Questions? 1-877-292-6442
Hello, Sign In
Your Account
0

Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women: Autobiographical Sketches - 05 edition

Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women: Autobiographical Sketches (ISBN10: 159102255X; ISBN13: 9781591022558)
ISBN13: 978-1591022558
ISBN10: 159102255X

Summary: Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) was the first woman awarded the M.D. degree in the United States. Here is the story of her dedicated, groundbreaking struggle to practice the medical profession, eloquently told in her own words. Born in England, she immigrated with her family to the United States in 1832. After teaching school for more than a decade, the medical profession gradually became an irresistible calling. Though faced with continuous discrimination, she graduated from medical
school in 1849--first in her class. Blackwell encountered further resistance in her attempts to set up a practice. When New York City's hospitals refused to offer her any post, she eventually opened up a small infirmary in a slum district. By 1868, after consultation with Florence Nightingale, she succeeded in founding the Woman's Medical College at the infirmary, which remained in operation for thirty-one years. During the American Civil War she performed valuable service by helping to organize the Woman's Central Association of Relief, which selected and trained nurses for the war, and the U.S. Sanitary Commission. In 1869, Blackwell moved permanently to England and was appointed professor of gynecology at the London School of Medicine for Women. Full of insightful reflections on the philosophy of medicine, women's education, the evils of slavery, and the nature of American society in the nineteenth century, this unique autobiography will interest scholars and students of women's studies and the history of science.
...show more
Summary: Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) was the first woman awarded the M.D. degree in the United States. Here is the story of her dedicated, groundbreaking struggle to practice the medical profession, eloquently told in her own words. Born in England, she immigrated with her family to the United States in 1832. After teaching school for more than a decade, the medical profession gradually became an irresistible calling. Though faced with continuous discrimination, she graduated from medical school in 1849--first in her class. Blackwell encountered further resistance in her attempts to set up a practice. When New York City's hospitals refused to offer her any post, she eventually opened up a small infirmary in a slum district. By 1868, after consultation with Florence Nightingale, she succeeded in founding the Woman's Medical College at the infirmary, which remained in operation for thirty-one years. During the American Civil War she performed valuable service by helping to organize the Woman's Central Association of Relief, which selected and trained nurses for the war, and the U.S. Sanitary Commission. In 1869, Blackwell moved permanently to England and was appointed professor of gynecology at the London School of Medicine for Women. Full of insightful reflections on the philosophy of medicine, women's education, the evils of slavery, and the nature of American society in the nineteenth century, this unique autobiography will interest scholars and students of women's studies and the history of science. ...show less

Edition/Copyright: 05
Cover:
Publisher: Humanity Books
Year Published: 2005
International: No



List Price: $0.00
Used  Currently Sold Out
New  Currently Sold Out
Close
Close
Close