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Revolutionary Road

Revolutionary Road - 89 edition

ISBN13: 978-0375708442

Cover of Revolutionary Road 89 (ISBN 978-0375708442)
ISBN13: 978-0375708442
ISBN10: 0375708448
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 89
Publisher: Vintage Books
Published: 1989
International: No

List price: $15.95

Revolutionary Road - 89 edition

ISBN13: 978-0375708442

Richard Yates

ISBN13: 978-0375708442
ISBN10: 0375708448
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 89
Publisher: Vintage Books

Published: 1989
International: No
Summary

ONE The final dying sounds of their dress rehearsal left the Laurel Players with nothing to do but stand there, silent and helpless, blinking out over the footlights of an empty auditorium. They hardly dared to breathe as the short, solemn figure of their director emerged from the naked seats to join them on stage, as he pulled a stepladder raspingly from the wings and climbed halfway up its rungs to turn and tell them, with several clearings of his throat, that they were a damned talented group of people and a wonderful group of people to work with. ''It hasn't been an easy job,'' he said, his glasses glinting soberly around the stage. ''We've had a lot of problems here, and quite frankly I'd more or less resigned myself not to expect too much. Well, listen. Maybe this sounds corny, but something happened up here tonight. Sitting out there tonight I suddenly knew, deep down, that you were all putting your hearts into your work for the first time.'' He let the fingers of one hand splay out across the pocket of his shirt to show what a simple, physical thing the heart was; then he made the same hand into a fist, which he shook slowly and wordlessly in a long dramatic pause, closing one eye and allowing his moist lower lip to curl out in a grimace of triumph and pride. ''Do that again tomorrow night,'' he said, ''and we'll have one hell of a show.'' They could have wept with relief. Instead, trembling, they cheered and laughed and shook hands and kissed one another, and somebody went out for a case of beer and they all sang songs around the auditorium piano until the time came to agree, unanimously, that they'd better knock it off and get a good night's sleep. ''See you tomorrow!'' they called, as happy as children, and riding home under the moon they found they could roll down the windows of their cars and let the air in, with its health-giving smells of loam and young flowers. It was the first time many of the Laurel Players had allowed themselves to acknowledge the comin