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Statics : Analysis and Design of Systems in Equilibrium

Statics : Analysis and Design of Systems in Equilibrium - 05 edition

ISBN13: 978-0471372998

Cover of Statics : Analysis and Design of Systems in Equilibrium 05 (ISBN 978-0471372998)
ISBN13: 978-0471372998
ISBN10: 0471372994
Cover type: Hardback
Edition/Copyright: 05
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Published: 2005
International: No

List price: $154.75

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Statics : Analysis and Design of Systems in Equilibrium - 05 edition

ISBN13: 978-0471372998

Sheri D. Sheppard and Benson H. Tongue

ISBN13: 978-0471372998
ISBN10: 0471372994
Cover type: Hardback
Edition/Copyright: 05
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Published: 2005
International: No
Summary

Engineering success starts here.

Your coursework in engineering mechanics helps you develop key analytical skills that you will rely on throughout your subsequent coursework and career. That's why Sheppard and Tongue's Statics: Analysis and Design of Systems in Equilibrium, and their accompanying volume, Dynamics: Analysis and Design of Systems in Motion, focus on helping you build the skills and knowledge you need to succeed.

Drawing free body diagrams starts here.

The authors continuously emphasize the importance of communicating solutions through graphics. They focus on drawing correct free body diagrams through an innovative illustration program used throughout the text, and dedicate a full chapter to free body diagrams to help you develop this vital skill.

Strong problem-solving skills start here.

Sheppard and Tongue introduce a consistent analysis procedure early in the text, and use it throughout, including all worked examples. This problem-solving methodology helps you develop the skills to apply these principles systematically in your analysis of mechanics problems.

Learning to simplify the complexities of engineered systems starts here.

Innovative real-world case studies and system analysis exercises show you how to simplify and model the system to perform analysis. Exercises introduce some basic design issues, inviting you to suggest design improvements.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION.

1.1 How Does Engineering Analysis Fit into Engineering Practice?

1.2 Physics Principles: Newton's Laws Reviewed.

1.3 Properties and Units in Engineering Analysis.

EXERCISES 1.3.

1.4 Coordinate Systems and Vectors.

EXERCISES 1.4.

1.5 Drawing.

EXERCISES 1.5.

1.6 Problem Solving.

EXERCISES 1.6 19

1.7 A Map of This Book.

1.8 Just the Facts.

CHAPTER 2: THE BICYCLE (''STATIC'' DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU AREN'T MOVING).

2.1 The Forces of Bicycling.

2.2 What Is the Maximum Speed?

2.3 Adding More Reality.

2.4 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA2.1 Exploring a Bicycle.

SA2.2 Analysis of Bicycle Performance.

CHAPTER 3: THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE.

3.1 A Walk Across the Bridge.

3.2 How Heavy Should the Anchorages Be?

3.3 Adding More Reality.

3.4 Just the Facts.

3.5 References.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA3.1 Exploring a Suspension Bridge.

SA3.2 Exploring a Beam Bridge.

SA3.3 Exploring an Arch Bridge.

SA3.4 Exploring a Cable-Stayed Bridge.

CHAPTER 4: FORCES.

4.1 What Are Forces?

4.2 Gravitational Forces.

EXAMPLE 4.1 Gravity, Weight, and Mass (A).

EXAMPLE 4.2 Gravity, Weight, and Mass (B).

EXAMPLE 4.3 Gravity, Weight, and Mass (C).

EXERCISES 4.2.

4.3 Contact Forces.

EXAMPLE 4.4 Types of Forces.

EXERCISES 4.3.

4.4 Analyzing Forces.

EXAMPLE 4.5 Practice in Applying the Engineering Analysis Procedure.

EXERCISES 4.4.

4.5 Magnitude and Direction Define a Force.

EXAMPLE 4.6 Representing Planar Forces (A).

EXAMPLE 4.7 Representing Planar Forces (B).

EXAMPLE 4.8 Representing Nonplanar Forces (A).

EXAMPLE 4.9 Representing Nonplanar Forces (B).

EXERCISES 4.5.

4.6 Resultant Force (Vector Addition).

EXAMPLE 4.10 Vector Addition Practice (A).

EXAMPLE 4.11 Vector Addition Practice (B).

EXAMPLE 4.12 Vector Addition Practice (C).

EXAMPLE 4.13 Vector Addition Practice (D).

EXERCISES 4.6.

4.7 Angle Between Two Forces (The Dot Product).

EXAMPLE 4.14 Vector Addition Practice (E).

EXERCISES 4.7.

4.8 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA4.1 Calibrating Your Capacity.

SA4.2 Estimating Force Values.

SA4.3 Problem: Forces to Hold the Scoreboard in Place.

SA5.3 Vehicle Recovery: Attempt 2.

SA5.4 Too Much Moment Can Topple a Crane.

CHAPTER 5: MOMENTS.

5.1 What Are Moments?

EXAMPLE 5.1 Specifying the Position Vector (A).

EXAMPLE 5.2 Specifying the Position Vector (B).

EXAMPLE 5.3 The Magnitude of the Moment (A).

EXAMPLE 5.4 The Magnitude of the Moment (B).

EXAMPLE 5.5 Increasing the Magnitude of the Moment (A).

EXAMPLE 5.6 Increasing the Magnitude of the Moment (B).

EXERCISES 5.1.

5.2 Mathematical Representation of a Moment.

EXAMPLE 5.7 Increasing the Magnitude of the Moment (C).

EXAMPLE 5.8 Calculating the Moment.

EXAMPLE 5.9 Moment Calculations for Various Physical Situations.

EXAMPLE 5.10 Another Example of Finding the Moment.

EXAMPLE 5.11 Finding the Force to Create a Moment (A).

EXAMPLE 5.12 Finding the Force to Create a Moment (B).

EXERCISES 5.2.

5.3 Finding Moment Component in a Particular Direction.

EXAMPLE 5.13 Using the Dot Product to Find the Moment in a Particular Direction.

EXERCISES 5.3.

5.4 Equivalent Loads.

EXAMPLE 5.14 Equivalent Moment and Equivalent Force (A).

EXAMPLE 5.15 Equivalent Moment and Equivalent Force (B).

EXAMPLE 5.16 Working with Couples (A).

EXAMPLE 5.17 Working with Couples (B).

EXAMPLE 5.18 Working with Couples (C).

EXAMPLE 5.19 Equivalent Loadings Including Couples.

EXAMPLE 5.20 Equivalent Loads Including Couples.

EXAMPLE 5.21 The Analysis Procedure Revisited.

EXERCISES 5.4.

5.5 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA5.1 Consideration of Left- and Right-Foot Pedaling.

SA5.2 Vehicle Recovery: Attempt 1.

SA6.3 Free-Body Diagram Based on Experimental Evidence.

SA6.4 Free-Body Diagram Based on Experimental Evidence with a Partner.

SA6.5 The Bicycle Revisited.

CHAPTER 6: DRAWING A FREE-BODY DIAGRAM.

6.1 Types of External Loads Acting on Systems.

EXERCISES 6.1.

6.2 Planar System Supports.

EXAMPLE 6.1 Complete Free-Body Diagrams.

EXAMPLE 6.2 Evaluating the Correctness of Free-Body Diagrams.

EXERCISES 6.2.

6.3 Nonplanar System Supports.

EXAMPLE 6.3 Exploring Single and Double Bearings and Hinges.

EXAMPLE 6.4 Evaluating the Correctness of Free-Body Diagrams.

EXERCISES 6.3.

6.4 Planar and Nonplanar Systems.

EXAMPLE 6.5 Identifying Planar and Nonplanar Systems.

EXAMPLE 6.6 Using Questions to Determine Loads at Supports (A).

EXAMPLE 6.7 Using Questions to Determine Loads at Solid Supports.

EXAMPLE 6.8 Using Questions to Determine Loads at Supports (B).

EXERCISE 6.4.

6.5 Distributed Forces.

EXERCISES 6.5.

6.6 Free-Body Diagram Details.

EXAMPLE 6.9 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Planar System (A).

EXAMPLE 6.10 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Planar System (B).

EXAMPLE 6.11 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Planar System (C).

EXAMPLE 6.12 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Nonplanar System (A).

EXAMPLE 6.13 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Nonplanar System (B).

EXAMPLE 6.14 Creating a Free-Body Diagram of a Nonplanar System (C).

EXERCISES 6.6.

6.7 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA6.1 Checking on the Design of a Chair.

SA6.2 Following the Path of the Gravitational Force.

CHAPTER 7: MECHANICAL EQUILIBRIUM.

7.1 Conditions of Mechanical Equilibrium.

EXAMPLE 7.1 Leaning Person.

7.2 Application of the Conditions--Planar Systems.

EXAMPLE 7.2 Cantilever Beam with Two Forces and a Moment.

EXAMPLE 7.3 A Simple Structure.

EXAMPLE 7.4 Planar Truss Connection.

EXAMPLE 7.5 Identifying Two-Force and Three-Force Elements.

EXAMPLE 7.6 Two-Force Element Analysis Example.

EXAMPLE 7.7 Three-Force Element Example.

EXAMPLE 7.8 Frictionless Pulley.

EXERCISES 7.2.

7.3 Application of the Conditions--Nonplanar Systems.

EXAMPLE 7.9 High-Wire Circus Act.

EXAMPLE 7.10 Cantilever Beam with Off-Center Force and Couple.

EXAMPLE 7.11 Nonplanar Problem with Unknowns Other Than Loads.

EXERCISES 7.3.

7.4 Zooming In.

EXAMPLE 7.12 Analysis of a Toggle Clamp.

EXAMPLE 7.13 Multiple Pulleys.

EXERCISES 7.4.

7.5 Determinate, Indeterminate, and Underconstrained Systems.

EXAMPLE 7.14 Identify Structure.

EXAMPLE 7.15 Considering a Statically Indeterminate Situation.

EXERCISES 7.5.

7.6 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA7.1 Bracing Against Moving Loads.

SA7.2 Keeping the Score Board in the Air.

SA7.3 Will the Chair Flip?

SA7.4 Analysis of a System in Various Configurations.

SA7.5 Arm Strength.

SA7.6 Friction on Golden Gate Bridge Anchorage.

SA7.7 Mechanical Equilibrium of a Vehicle.

SA7.8 Ancient Siege Engines.

SA7.9 Ancient Siege Engines--Other Design Ideas.

SA7.10 Evaluation of a Lattice Boom Crane.

CHAPTER 8: DISTRIBUTED FORCE.

8.1 Center of Mass, Center of Gravity, and the Centroid.

EXAMPLE 8.1 Centroid of a Volume.

EXAMPLE 8.2 Center of Mass with Distributed Mass.

EXAMPLE 8.3 Locating the Centroid of a Composite Volume.

EXAMPLE 8.4 Finding the Centroid of an Area.

EXAMPLE 8.5 Center of Mass.

EXAMPLE 8.6 Centroid of a Built-Up Section.

EXERCISES 8.1.

8.2 Distributed Force Acting on a Boundary.

EXAMPLE 8.7 Beam with Complex Distribution of Line Loads.

EXAMPLE 8.8 Slanted Surface with Nonuniform Distribution.

EXAMPLE 8.9 Complex Line Load Distribution.

EXAMPLE 8.10 Beam with Multiple Line Loads.

EXAMPLE 8.11 Calculating Center of Pressure of a Complex Pressure Distribution.

EXAMPLE 8.12 Rectangular Water Gate.

EXERCISES 8.2.

8.3 Hydrostatic Pressure.

EXAMPLE 8.13 Proof of Nondirectionality of Fluid Pressure.

EXAMPLE 8.14 Proof That Hydrostatic Pressure Increases Linearly with Depth.

EXAMPLE 8.15 Water Reservoir.

EXAMPLE 8.16 Sloped Gate with Linear Distribution.

EXAMPLE 8.17 Pressure Distribution Over a Curved Surface.

EXAMPLE 8.18 Center of Buoyancy and Stability.

EXERCISES 8.3.

8.4 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA8.1 What Does It Take to Empty the Trash?

SA8.2 Ballast in Submarines.

SA8.3 How to Remove the Packages.

SA8.4 The Freedom Ship.

SA8.5 Center of Mass Calculations.

SA8.6 Fighter Jet Design.

CHAPTER 9: INTERNAL LOADS IN FRAMES, MACHINES, AND TRUSSES.

9.1 Frame Analysis.

EXAMPLE 9.1 Planar Frame Analysis.

EXAMPLE 9.2 Internally Unstable Frame.

EXAMPLE 9.3 Internally Unstable Frame with Friction.

EXAMPLE 9.4 Nonplanar Frame Analysis.

EXAMPLE 9.5 Determining Status of a Frame.

EXAMPLE 9.6 Special Conditions in Frames.

EXERCISES 9.1.

9.2 Machines.

EXAMPLE 9.7 Force Multiplication.

EXAMPLE 9.8 Analysis of a Toggle Clamp.

EXAMPLE 9.9 Bicycle Brake.

EXAMPLE 9.10 Analysis of a Gear Train.

EXAMPLE 9.11 Analysis of a Bicycle Power Train.

EXAMPLE 9.12 Analysis of a Pulley System with Bearing Friction.

EXAMPLE 9.13 Analysis of a Gear Train with Friction.

EXAMPLE 9.14 Rolling Resistance.

EXERCISES 9.2.

9.3 Truss Analysis.

EXAMPLE 9.15 Identify Systems as Trusses or Frames.

EXAMPLE 9.16 Truss Analysis Using Method of Joints.

EXAMPLE 9.17 Method of Sections (A).

EXAMPLE 9.18 Method of Sections (B).

EXAMPLE 9.19 Combination of Method of Joints and Method of Sections.

EXAMPLE 9.20 Checking the Status of Planar Trusses.

EXAMPLE 9.21 Status of Space Trusses.

EXERCISES 9.3.

9.4 Just the Facts.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA9.1 The Marvelous Truss.

SA9.2 A Self-Erecting Basketball Goal for the Reynolds Coliseum.

SA9.3 Analysis of Bicycle Performance.

SA9.4 Review of Chapter 2 Analysis.

SA9.5 Designing a Bridge.

SA9.6 Internal Loads in a Crane.

SA9.7 A Heavy Load.

CHAPTER 10: ''OUT ON A LIMB'' AND ''HUNG OUT

TO DRY'': A LOOK AT INTERNAL LOADS

IN BEAMS AND CABLES.

10.1 Beams.

EXAMPLE 10.1 Beam Identification.

EXAMPLE 10.2 A Beam Within a Frame.

EXAMPLE 10.3 Internal Loads in a Planar Beam (A).

EXAMPLE 10.4 Internal Loads in a Planar Beam (B).

EXAMPLE 10.5 Loads in a Nonplanar Beam.

EXAMPLE 10.6 Shear, Moment, and Axial Force Diagram for a Simply Supported Beam.

EXAMPLE 10.7 A Simple Beam.

EXAMPLE 10.8 Beam Analysis.

EXAMPLE 10.9 A Simply Supported Beam with an Overhang.

EXAMPLE 10.10 Using Equations 10.3 (A, B, and C).

EXAMPLE 10.11 Exploring Equation (10.4).

EXERCISES 10.1.

10.2 Flexible Cables.

EXAMPLE 10.12 Flexible Cable with Concentrated Loads.

EXAMPLE 10.13 Catenary Curve.

EXAMPLE 10.14 Catenary with Supports at Different Elevations.

EXAMPLE 10.15 Loaded Cable (Uniformly).

EXAMPLE 10.16 Uniformly Loaded Cable with Supports at Unequal Heights.

EXAMPLE 10.17 Catenary versus Parabolic.

EXERCISES 10.2.

10.3 Just the Facts.

NOTES.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS (SA) EXERCISES.

SA10.1 Handle Design for the Money-Maker Plus Water Pump.

SA10.2 Golden Gate Bridge Approximate Analysis 1.

SA10.3 Golden Gate Bridge Approximate Analysis 2.

SA10.4 Form Follows Function.

SA10.5 Hoover Dam.

SA10.6 How Much Load Does a Main Column Carry?

APPENDIX A.

A1 Selected Topics in Mathematics.

A2 Physical Quantities.

A3 Properties of Areas and Volumes.

APPENDIX B. DRY FRICTION.

EXERCISES.

APPENDIX C. MOMENT OF INERTIA OF AREA.

EXERCISES.

INDEX.

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