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Universe / Text Only

Universe / Text Only - 6th edition

ISBN13: 978-0716741183

Cover of Universe / Text Only 6TH 02 (ISBN 978-0716741183)
ISBN13: 978-0716741183
ISBN10: 0716741180
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 6TH 02
Publisher: W.H. Freeman
Published: 2002
International: No

List price: $94.75

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Universe / Text Only - 6TH 02 edition

ISBN13: 978-0716741183

William J. Kaufmann and Roger Freedman

ISBN13: 978-0716741183
ISBN10: 0716741180
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 6TH 02
Publisher: W.H. Freeman

Published: 2002
International: No
Summary

From its first edition, Universe has helped guide students through introductory astronomy by emphasizing not only what we know about the cosmos but also how we know it. Acclaimed for its spectacular images and engaging writing, Universe clearly communicates the thrill of discovery in astronomy to all students, regardless of their scientific background.

Author Bio

Freedman, Roger : University of California, Santa Barbara

Kaufmann, William J. : San Diego State University

Table of Contents

Part I - Introducing Astronomy
1. Astronomy and the Universe
2.Knowing the Heavens
3. Eclipses and the Motion of the Moon

"The Heavens on the Earth" boxes relate astronomy to everyday life. In Chapter 3, "Phases and Shadows" describes a simple experiment anyone can do to help them understand lunar phases.
"Tools of the Astronomers Trade" boxes such as Box 3-2 help students solve quantitative problems in astronomy.

3-1 The phases of the Moon are caused by the Moon's orbital motion
Box 3-1 The Heavens on the Earth: Phases and Shadows
3-2 The Moon rotation always keeps the same face toward the Earth
3-3 Eclipses occur only when the Sun and Moon are both on the line of nodes
3-4 Lunar eclipses can be either total, partial, or penumbral, depending on the alignment of the Sun, Earth, and Moon
3-5 Solar eclipses can be either total, partial, or annular, depending on the alignment of the Sun, Earth, and Moon
Box 3-2 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Predicting Solar Eclipses
3-6 Ancient astronomers measured the size of the Earth and attempted to determine distances to the Sun and Moon
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Supplementary material on the CD-ROM and web site: "Some Details of the Moon's Orbit"

4. Gravitation and the Waltz of the Planets
New chapter structure (Copernicus, Galileo, Brahe, Kepler, Newton) makes it easier for students to understand the development of ideas about the solar system
New section on tidal forces presents this topic as a natural consequence of Newton's law of gravitation

4-1 Ancient astronomers invented geocentric models to explain planetary motions
4-2 Nicolaus Copernicus devised the first comprehensive heliocentric model
Box 4-1 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Relating Synodic and Sidereal Periods
4-3 Galileo's discoveries with a telescope strongly supported a heliocentric model
4-4 Tycho Brahe's astronomical observations disproved ancient ideas about the heavens
4-5 Johannes Kepler proposed elliptical paths for the planets about the sun
Box 4-2 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Using Kepler's Third Law
4-6 Isaac Newton formulated three laws that describe fundamental properties of physical reality
Box 4-3 The Heavens on the Earth: Newton's Laws in Everyday Life
4-7 Newton's description of gravity accounts for Kepler's laws and explains the motions of the planets
4-8 Gravitational forces between the Earth and Moon produce tides
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects

5. The Nature of Light
6. Optics and Telescopes


Part II - Planets and Moons
7. Our Solar System
Updated information about asteroids, comets, and extrasolar planets
New material on chondrules in Section 7-8 explains what these artifacts tell us about the formation of the planets

7-1 There are two broad categories of planets, Earth-like and Jupiter-like
Box 7-1 The Heavens on the Earth: Average Density
7-2 Seven large satellites are almost as big as the terrestrial planets
7-3 Spectroscopy reveals the chemical composition of the planets
7-4 Hydrogen and helium are abundant on the Jovian planets, whereas the terrestrial planets are composed mostly of heavy elements
Box 7-2 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Kinetic Energy, Temperature, and Whether Planets Have Atmospheres
7-5 Small chunks of rock and ice also orbit the Sun
7-6 The relative abundances of the elements are the result of cosmic processes
7-7 The Sun and planets formed from a solar nebula
7-8 The planets formed by the accretion of planetesimals and the accumulation of gases in the solar nebula
7-9 Astronomers have discovered planets orbiting other stars
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Guest Essay Geoff Marcy/Alien Planets

8. Our Living Earth
Chapter 8 has been totally revised to emphasize the interactions between the Earth's interior, surface, oceans, and atmosphere
New Section 8-5 describes the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere
Supplementary material has been moved to the CD-ROM and web site, making the book slimmer while still making this information available to you and your students

8-1 The Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and surface are extraordinarily active
8-2 Studies of earthquakes reveal the Earth's layered interior structure
8-3 Plate tectonics produce earthquakes, mountain ranges, and volcanoes that shape the Earth's surface
8-4 The Earth's magnetic field produces a magnetosphere that traps particles from the solar wind
8-5 The Earth's atmosphere has changed substantially over our planet's history
8-6 A burgeoning human population is profoundly altering the Earth's biosphere
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Supplementary material on the CD-ROM and web site: "Radioactive Age-Dating," "Atmospheric Pressure," "The Surprising Inner Core of the Earth," and "The Origin of the Earth's Magnetic Field," and "The Earth's Thermosphere and Ionosphere"

9. Our Barren Moon
10. Sun-Scorched Mercury
11. Cloud-Covered Venus
12. Red Planet Mars
13. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets
14. The Galilean Satellites of Jupiter
15. The Spectacular Saturnian System
16. The Outer Worlds
17. Vagabonds of the Solar System


Part III - Stars & Stellar Evolution
18. Our Star, the Sun
Chapter 18 has been totally restructured to present the Sun "from the inside out"--the source of the Sun's energy is discussed before the solar atmosphere
New images depict supergranulation, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections
As in Chapter 8, supplementary material has been moved to the CD-ROM and web site, making the book slimmer while still making this information available to you and your students

18.1 The Sun's energy is generated by thermonuclear reactions in its core
18-1 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Converting Mass into Energy
18-2. A theoretical model of the Sun shows how energy gets from its center to its surface
18-3. Astronomers prove the solar interior using the Sun's own vibrations
18-4. Neutrinos provide information about the Sun's core--and have surprises of their own
18-5. The photosphere is the lowest of three main layers in the Sun's atmosphere
18-6. The chromosphere is characterized by spikes of rising gas
18-7. The corona ejects mass into space to form the solar wind
18-8. Sunspots are low-temperature regions in the photosphere
18-9. Sunspots are produced by a 22-year cycle in the Sun's magnetic field
18-10. The Sun's magnetic field also produces other forms of solar activity
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Guest Essay John Bachall/Searching for Neutrinos Beyond the Textbooks
Supplementary material on the CD-ROM and web site: "The Proton-Proton Chain and the CNO Cycle" and "The Zeeman Effect"

19. The Nature of Stars
20. The Birth of Stars
21. Stellar Evolution: After the Main Sequence
22. Stellar Evolution: The Death of Stars
23. Neutron Stars
24. Black Holes

Chapter 24 has been revised to emphasize observations of black holes as well as black hole theory
New sections describe supermassive black holes and Hawking radiation
As in Chapters 8 and 18, supplementary material has been moved to the CD-ROM and web site, making the book slimmer while still making this information available to you and your students

24-1 Special relativity changes our conceptions of space and time
Box 24-1 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: Time Dilation and Length Contraction
24-2 General relativity predicts black holes
24-3 Several binary star systems contain black holes
24-4 Supermassive black holes exist at the centers of most galaxies
24-5 A black hole is a simple object
Box 24-2 Tools of the Astronomer's Trade: The Schwarzschild Radius
24-6 Falling into a black hole is an infinite voyage
Box 24-3 The Heavens on the Earth: Time Machines and Wormholes
24-7 Black holes evaporate
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Supplementary material on the CD-ROM and web site: "The Search for Gravitational Waves"


Part IV - Galaxies and Cosmology
25. Our Galaxy
26.Galaxies
27. Quasars, Blazars, and Active Galaxies
28. Cosmology: The Creation and Fate of the Universe
29. Exploring the Early Universe
30. The Search for Extraterrestrial Life

Chapter 30 has been expanded to include the search for extraterrestrial life of all kinds, from single cells to advanced civilizations
New Section 30-2 describes the ongoing search for life in our solar system

30-1 The chemical building blocks of life are found throughout space
30-2 Europa and Mars are promising places for life to have evolved
30-3 Meteorites from Mars have been scrutinized for life forms
30-4 The Drake equation helps scientists estimate how many civilizations may inhabit our Galaxy
30-5 Radio searches for alien civilizations are under way
30-6 Infrared telescopes in space will soon begin searching for Earthlike planets
Key Words and Ideas
Questions and Projects
Guest Essay Matthew Golombek/Exploring Mars

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