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Western Philosophy

Western Philosophy - 2nd edition

ISBN13: 978-1405124782

Cover of Western Philosophy 2ND 08 (ISBN 978-1405124782)
ISBN13: 978-1405124782
ISBN10: 1405124784
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 08
Publisher: Blackwell Publishers
Published: 2008
International: No
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Western Philosophy - 2ND 08 edition

ISBN13: 978-1405124782

John G. Cottingham

ISBN13: 978-1405124782
ISBN10: 1405124784
Cover type: Paperback
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 08
Publisher: Blackwell Publishers

Published: 2008
International: No
Summary

Western Philosophy: An Anthology provides the most comprehensive and authoritative survey of the Western philosophical tradition from ancient Greece to the leading philosophers of today. In 144 substantial and carefully chosen extracts, the volume covers all the main branches of philosophy - theory of knowledge and metaphysics, philosophy of mind, religion and science, moral philosophy (theoretical and applied), political theory and aesthetics. Chronologically and thematically arranged, the readings are introduced and linked together by a lucid philosophical commentary which guides the reader through the key arguments. For this new edition, all the existing sections have been updated with additional contemporary extracts, and two completely new sections on logic and language, and philosophy and the meaning of life have been included. This outstanding text will support a wide variety of introductory courses in philosophy, as well as providing more advanced students with an indispensable collection of classic source materials.

Table of Contents

Prefacecknowledgementsdvice to Readers and Format of the Volumeart


I: Knowledge and Certainty:. Innate Knowledge: Plato, Meno. Knowledge versus Opinion: Plato, Republic. Demonstrative Knowledge and its Starting-points: Aristotle, Posterior Analytics. New Foundations for Knowledge: Ren� Descartes, Meditations. The Senses as the Basis of Knowledge: John Locke, Essay concerning Human Understanding. Innate Knowledge Defended: Gottfried Leibniz, New Essays on Human Understanding. Scepticism versus Human Nature: David Hume, Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Experience and Understanding: Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason. From Sense-certainty to Self-consciousness: Georg Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit0. Against Scepticism: G. E. Moore, A Defence of Common Sense1. Does Empirical Knowledge Have a Foundation? Wilfrid Sellars, The Myth of the Given2. The Conditions for Knowledge: Edmund Gettier, Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?pecimen Questionsuggestions for Further Readingart


II: Being and Reality:. The Allegory of the Cave: Plato, Republic. Individual Substance: Aristotle, Categories. Supreme Being and Created Things: Ren� Descartes, Principles of Philosophy. Qualities and Ideas: John Locke, Essay concerning Human Understanding. Substance, Life and Activity: Gottfried Leibniz, New System. Nothing Outside the Mind: George Berkeley, Principles of Human Knowledge. The Limits of Metaphysical Speculation: David Hume, Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. Metaphysics, Old and New: Immanuel Kant, Prolegomena. Being and Involvement: Martin Heidegger, Being and Time0. The End of Metaphysics?: Rudolf Carnap, The Elimination of Metaphysics1. The Problem of Ontology: W. V. O. Quine, On What There Is2. Why Is There Anything?: Derek Parfit, The Puzzle of Realitypecimen Questionsuggestions for Further Readingart


III: Language and Meaning:. The Meaning of Words: Plato, Cratylus. Language and its Acquisition: Augustine, Confessions. Thought, Language and its Components: William of Ockham, Writings on Logic. Language, Reason and Animal Utterance: Ren� Descartes, Discourse on the Method. Abstract General Ideas: John Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Particular Ideas and General Meaning: George Berkeley, Principles of Human Knowledge. Denotation versus Connotation: John Stuart Mill, A System of Logic. Names and their Meaning: Gottlob Frege, Sense and Reference. Definite Descriptions: Bertrand Russell, Introduction to Mathematical Logic0. Non-descriptive Uses of Language: J. L. Austin, Performative Utterances1. Language, Meaning and Context: Paul Grice, Logic and Conversation2. How the Reference of Terms is Fixed: Saul Kripke, Naming and Necessitypecimen Questionsuggestions for Further Readingart


IV: Mind and Body:. The Immortal Soul: Plato, Phaedo. Soul and Body, Form and Matter: Aristotle, De Anima. The Human Soul: Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae. The Incorporeal Mind: Ren� Descartes, Meditations. The Identity of Mind and Body: Benedict Spinoza, Ethics. Mind-Body Correlations: Nicolas Malebranche, Dialogues on Metaphysics. Body and Mind as Manifestations of Will: Arthur Schopenhauer, The World as Will and Idea. The Problem of Other Minds: John Stuart Mill, An Examination of Sir William Hamilton''s Philosophy. The Hallmarks of Mental Phenomena: Franz Brentano, Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint0. The Myth of the''Ghost in the Machine'': Gilbert Ryle, The Concept of Mind1. Mental States as Functional States: Hilary Putnam, Psychological Predicates2. The Subjective Dimension of Consciousness: Thomas Nagel, What is it Like to be a Bat?pecimen Questionsuggestions for Further Readingart


V: The Self and Freedom:a) The Self. The Self and Consciousness: John Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The Self as Primitive Concept: Joseph Butler, Of Personal Identity. The Self as Bundle: David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature. The Partly Hidden Self: Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis. Liberation from the Self: D