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Who Will Feed China?

Who Will Feed China? - 95 edition

ISBN13: 978-0393314090

Cover of Who Will Feed China? 95 (ISBN 978-0393314090)
ISBN13: 978-0393314090
ISBN10: 039331409X
Cover type: Print On Demand
Edition/Copyright: 95
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.
Published: 1995
International: No

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Who Will Feed China? - 95 edition

ISBN13: 978-0393314090

Lester R. Brown

ISBN13: 978-0393314090
ISBN10: 039331409X
Cover type: Print On Demand
Edition/Copyright: 95
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.

Published: 1995
International: No
Summary

This book "predicts that China's current breakneck industrialization will lead to massive world grain shortages early in the next century. . . . Using Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan as . . . examples of countries that were densely populated when they embarked on rapid industrialization, similar to China's present situation, Brown points out that these countries developed in such a way that they were compelled to import the majority of the grain their populations consumed.He . . . {argues} that the major world challenge in the future is not military aggression but, rather, food scarcity."(Libr J)Index.

To feed its 1.2 billion people, China may soon have to import so much grain that this action could trigger unprecedented rises in world food prices. In Who Will Feed China: Wake-up Call for a Small Planet, Lester Brown shows that even as water becomes more scarce in a land where 80 percent of the grain crop is irrigated, as per-acre yield gains are erased by the loss of cropland to industrialization, and as food production stagnates, China still increases its population by the equivalent of a new Beijing each year. When Japan, a nation of just 125 million, began to import food, world grain markets rejoiced. But when China, a market ten times bigger, starts importing, there may not be enough grain in the world to meet that need - and food prices will rise steeply for everyone. Analysts foresaw that the recent four-year doubling of income for China's 1.2 billion consumers would increase food demand, especially for meat, eggs, and beer. But these analysts assumed that food production would rise to meet those demands.

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