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Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment - rev edition

Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment - rev edition

ISBN13: 9780029166765

ISBN10: 0029166764

Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment by James H. Jones - ISBN 9780029166765
Cover type: Paperback
Edition: REV 93
Copyright: 1993
Publisher: Free Press
Published:
International: No
Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment by James H. Jones - ISBN 9780029166765

ISBN13: 9780029166765

ISBN10: 0029166764

Cover type: Paperback
Edition: REV 93

List price: $17.95

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Summary

The author James H. Jones does an excellent job of unveiling a wall of medical conspiracy towards a people, while managing to refrain from creating a tone of acrimony for those inflicting the prejudice. The basic flow of ideas in the novel is ideal. Jones begins the novel with and explanation of the disease and the ways that it may be spread, and then an explanation of the root of the case study that spawned from information regarding the disease. Rather than simply jump into the details of the actual experiment, Jones appropriated the first seven chapters to background information about the disease, and the effects that certain issues had on the fruition of the actual experiment. Jones brought in several references to the ideologies of certain individuals regarding the overall knowledge, cleanliness, and economic status of African Americans. In doing so, he provides the reader with a fly on the wall chance to listen in on the intimate conversations of those administering aid in the destitute counties in Alabama. After describing the rationale behind the experiment's implementation, Jones goes into describing the actual experiment, detailing how men were denied treatment due to their placement on the ''list''. By continuously emphasizing the aspects that lead to the continuation of the case study, a broader more pertinent issue can be discussed regarding the lack of the determinants of health in experiments such as this. One of the issues that remains in the back of the reader's mind is whether this degree of medicinal research could occur in a more civilized area, such as New York, or Washington D.C. Although the answer is yes, it does not come without the stipulation that it would be to a much lesser degree, and in a much more private manner. Because of the demographics of the counties in Alabama, the spread of treatment was limited to only those who were able commute, or be commuted to, and the extent of the treatment was dependent upon the Negro's education about the disease. The issue of education is made imperative in the novel by Jones' acknowledgement that even if treatment reached the Negro, if they felt themselves to be cured, then they would feel no need to return for further therapy, not knowing that full treatment required at least a year's worth of medication. One may have not full understood Jones's preface, had he not included several statements to provide a summary of the views of the Doctors in Alabama at the time. Such statements include one by a Dr. Harris who although at first was the only optimistic doctor regarding the treatment of syphilis, had grown very skeptical of it's success. When asked of his final opinions regarding continuation of treatment in Alabama, Harris responded It is use less to attempt to cure syphilis in the rural Negro population in Macon County, Alabama, until and unless some way is found to treat the large number of cases of tuberculosis, malnutrition, and pellagra, and also give some fundamental training in living habits, with the necessary attention provided to enable on to earn a living. (p. 83) By incorporating quotes such as this in his text, Jones gives the reader a broader understanding of the several different elements that contributed to the decision-makings of the United States Public Health Service. Another key element of the novel was Jones' acknowledgement of the belief of many Blacks that AIDS is a program of racial genocide employed by whites to exterminate Blacks. Again, his ability to maintain a neutral tone without coming off as livid because of the idea is prevalent. Jones mentions how many Blacks have used the Tuskegee Study to support their conspiracy theory. Without coming off as for or against this theory, Jones states his goal for the book. He wants Bad Blood to be used to help place the fears of the Blacks who feel this way about the development of AIDS in relation to syphilis, in the public so that they may be dealt with sympathetically and with efficacy. This goal is definitely achieved in the novel. Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment can be used by many who are interested in medicinal conspiracy and other related topics, in an effort to trace the mysterious origins of aids and several other incurable STD's that are now omnipresent in our society. By reminding the reader that scientists have been unable to determine whether AIDS is a new disease or an old pathogen that mutated and became more virulent, Jones leaves a number of questions in the reader's mind that lead to a deeper review of medical scheme's that may be occurring in our country. Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, is an excellent read, and the author's purpose to kindle curiosity, educate and inform is achieved.

Author Bio

Jones, James H. : University of Houston

James H. Jones is associate professor of history at the University of Houston. He lives in Houston, Texas. He received his Ph.D. in history from Indiana University and has held a Kennedy Fellowship in Bioethics at Harvard University, served as a senior research fellow at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, and recently held senior fellowships from both the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Rockefeller Foundation. He published the first edition of Bad Blood in 1981 to critical acclaim. It was a Main Selection of the History Book Club and a New York Times Best Books of 1981 and has inspired a play, a PBS Nova special, and a motion picture.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Preface to the New and Expanded Edition
Acknowledgments
A Note on Spelling and Punctuation

1 A Moral Astigmatism
2 A Notoriously Syphilis-Soaked Race
3 Disease Germs Are the Most Democratic Creatures in the World
4 Holding High Wasserman in the Marketplace
5 The Dr. Ain't Taking Sticks
6 Buying Ear Muffs for the Hottentots
7 It Will Either Cover Us with Mud or Glory
8 Last Chance for Special Free Treatment
9 Bringing Them to Autopsy
10 The Joy of My Life
11 Even at Risk of Shortening Life
12 Nothing Learned Will Prevent, Find, or Cure a Single Case
13 I Ain't Never Understood the Study
14 AIDS: Is It Genocide?

Notes
A Note on Sources
Indexes
About the Author

Other Editions of Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

Bad Blood : The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment a Race of Race and Medicine by James Howard Jones - ISBN 9780029166901