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Law of Love / With CD

Law of Love / With CD - 96 edition

Law of Love / With CD - 96 edition

ISBN13: 9780609801277

ISBN10: 0609801279

Law of Love / With CD by Laura Esquivel - ISBN 9780609801277
Edition: 96
Copyright: 1996
Publisher: Three Rivers Press
Published:
International: No
Law of Love / With CD by Laura Esquivel - ISBN 9780609801277

ISBN13: 9780609801277

ISBN10: 0609801279

Edition: 96

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Summary

The Law of Love - Excerpt When do the dead die? When they are forgotten. When does a city disappear? When it no longer exists in the memory of those who lived there. And when does love cease? When one begins to love anew. Of this there is no doubt. That is why Hernan Cortes decided to construct a new city upon the ruins of the ancient Tenochtitlan. The time it took him to size up the situation was the same that it takes a firmly gripped sword to pierce the skin of the chest and reach the center of the heart: one second. But in time of battle, a split second can mean escaping the sword or being run through by it. During the conquest of Mexico, only those who could react in an instant survived, those who so feared death that they placed all their instincts, all their reflexes, all their senses, at the service of that fear. Terror became the command center for all their actions. Located just behind the navel, it received before the brain all the sensations perceived by smell, sight, touch, hearing, and taste. These were processed in milliseconds and forwarded to the brain, along with a precise course of action. All this lasted no more than the one second essential for survival. As rapidly as the Conquistadors' bodies were acquiring the ability to react, new senses were also evolving. They learned to anticipate an attack from the rear, smell blood before it was spilled, sense a betrayal before the first word was uttered, and, above all, to see into the future as well as the keenest oracle. This was why, on the very day Cortes saw an Indian sounding a conch in front of the remains of an ancient pyramid, he knew he could not leave the city in ruins. It would have been like leaving a monument to the grandeur of the Aztecs. Sooner or later, nostalgia would have prompted the Indians to regroup in an attempt to regain their city. There was no time to lose. He had to obliterate all trace of the great Tenochtitlan from Aztec memory. He had to constr