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When the Rivers Run Dry

When the Rivers Run Dry - 06 edition

When the Rivers Run Dry - 06 edition

ISBN13: 9780807085721

ISBN10: 0807085723

When the Rivers Run Dry by Fred Pearce - ISBN 9780807085721
Cover type: Hardback
Edition: 06
Copyright: 2006
Publisher: Beacon Press, Inc.
Published:
International: No
When the Rivers Run Dry by Fred Pearce - ISBN 9780807085721

ISBN13: 9780807085721

ISBN10: 0807085723

Cover type: Hardback
Edition: 06

List price: $26.95

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Summary

It was with the Colorado River that engineers first learned to control great rivers. But now the Colorado''s reservoirs are two-thirds empty. Great rivers like the Indus and the Nile, the Rio Grande and the Yellow River are running on empty. And economists say that by 2025, water scarcity will cut global food production by more than the current U.S. grain harvest. Veteran science correspondent Fred Pearce traveled to more than thirty countries while researching When the Rivers Run Dry; it is our most complete portrait yet of the growing world water crisis. Deftly weaving together the complicated scientific, economic, and historical dimensions of the crisis, he shows us its complex origins, from waste to wrong-headed engineering projects to high-yield crop varieties that have kept developing countries from starvation but are now emptying their water reserves. And Pearce''s vivid reportage reveals the personal stories behind failing rivers, barren fields, desertification, water wars, floods, and even the death of cultures. Finally, Pearce argues that the solution to the growing worldwide water shortage is not more and bigger dams but greater efficiency and a new water ethic based on managing the water cycle for maximum social benefit rather than narrow self-interest.